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  • Charles Cherutich

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    What is the current number of UTS Alumni? What amount per year is required for UTS to be viable? This will determine whether donations from Alumni can make a significant dent.

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  • Robin Graham

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    There have been funding recommendations.
    I suggest that folks take the pressure of HSA finances, and make direct donations to UTS and Barrytown College.
    Thanks.

    http://barrytown.uts.edu/donate.html

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  • Daniel Hess

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    UTS is without a doubt one of the most beautiful properties that the movement owns in the western hemisphere. All those hills and trees and trails and fields are incredible natural beauty that costs little to maintain (and while that doesn’t include the cost of maintaining the structures, the cost of just replacing what actually breaks must be far less than what it would cost to build those beautiful buildings today). Father spent countless hours in and around this place, and there is no question in my mind that is much easier and more natural to connect with God and our inner selves in such a place than in any city. Father was his happiest, most whole when out in creation in Barrytown and elsewhere, and this is true for large numbers of us. If the property is lost, it will probably be impossible to get back. Symbolically the loss of Barrytown would be a big defeat in the hearts of American members (including thousands of 2nd gen) whose happiest memories are in that place.

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  • Denneze Nelson

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    There is much that could be done quickly to avert a total if reasonable and willing heads come together. Also if there is the spiritual and political will to capitalize on the ideas that would be put forward. UTS may have educated many of us but many graduates still feel very estranged. Another university that I graduated from has very unique methods of soliciting my attention and money. If there is an effective short term proposition and a solid long-term plan, then strong advocacy to Federal financial aid program could win. Although there needs to be serious concern about losing UTS or Barrytown college, now is not the time to for a thorough review of the shortcomings that the commission is citing and creative intervention strategies. There is no time for despair over losing jobs. If the greater purpose is addressed then the individual positions could be upheld. Just my two cents!

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    • Denneze Nelson

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      Correction “to avert at total shutdown”
      Sorry!

      Reply

      • Denneze Nelson

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        Next correction: …Barrytown college, now is the time for a thorough…

        Sorry I submitted when I did not intend to.

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  • Matthias

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    Dear Micheal Balcomb,
    Thank you for your letter trying to clarify the present situation of UTS.
    Although I’m not living in the USA I’m concerned what decisions our movement
    is taking there, since it is in an older brother position and a model to many nations.
    In order to understand better the whole issue I would suggest to explain a bit more the following statement in your letter.

    “Most recently, the central focus of UTS has been the establishment of an undergraduate program, which is now in its second full year. Unfortunately, the program has run into a number of difficulties, including much lower than anticipated recruitment, delayed access to Federal financial aid and numerous other challenges. This has all contributed to a real and pressing question about the viability of the program.”

    I may be wrong, but to me it seems that the key problem is that there are not enough people interested to study at UTS. If this is correct, then we should focus
    on understanding the reasons behind this problem.

    My personal opinion is, that after graduating from UTS most students experience difficulties securing some paid employment with the skills and knowledge they have acquired.
    We should make a survey to find out, what all the UTS graduates have done after leaving UTS. How their studies has helped them in their career and what benefit
    our movement or other institution received from them.
    I believe a market research within our movement could also help to evaluate the need of the product and service of UTS.
    If such a survey already exists, it would be interesting to hear about it and to find out in which way it has been applied to UTS.

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  • youngsoon q

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    What if more people decided to attend UTS as a student? It could give funding to the school, and a good seminary experience for the members. win-win?

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  • Susana Pearson

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    Coming together with other clericaltype/value based programs that include spirituality would be a great way, I Think, for us (UC) to really put into practice what we say we stand for. We are the Unificationist are we not? There are many organizations that can match some of the values UTS/College is standing for. These organizations can be stronger as well as us of we partnered financially not to mention the grounds. If that is possible, we are then really the Unificationist! We are aware the of walls faced by all people of faith. All are challenged to survive, to continue, to maintain and to be sustainable. All are challenged with the “what’s to be of our youth if main stream education is all they have?”. It’s such a challenge to stay on the path acknowledging inner life of faith, virtues and values that keep our humanity connected. Is that a vision of Unificationists? Why we have that name? Then let’s live it and find ways to do it. I feel this opens a door for inclusion of other faiths, institutions and organizations facing same and or similar issues….

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  • Sally Sayre

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    Even though Dr. Balcomb’s letter expresses hope that UTS can continue Father’s vision, if MSA has already put UTS on probationary status, how can firing the president and withholding funding help matters? It seems far more likely that these draconian measures will convince MSA that UTS is no longer a viable institution. It’s analogous to a clipper ship in full sail having those sails ripped from their masts and killing the captain while still expecting the ship to reach the harbor intact.

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  • Robert Maynard

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    The key is to follow the lead of Liberty University and create a large “virtual” student body from all over the world that pays only tuition, but studies wherever they are over the Internet. Virtual education is the wave of the future in thre 21st Century Information Age. Why not get out in front of this trend? It would require more focus on faculty with accademic standing and less on whether they are subservient to the Church. Of course, they could not be hostile.

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  • Laura Taylor Hayashi

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    The thing that disappointed me the most was the lack of transparency and representation. Most of us understand the economic situation, but as you can understand from the outpouring of concern, it feels like another betrayal that a few are deciding without much communication or consideration for the members. I hope True Mother is directly aware of the situation, and not prevented from hearing all sides. Why the effort to oust Dr. Panzer? Please let us know. Appreciate your consideration, and all that you do. YES to CARP Las Vegas; but this is rather new and temporal. Please consider what many are advising to help generate funds and make a way for a new future – hopefully – with our Barrytown campus.

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    • Robert Maynard

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      “The thing that disappointed me the most was the lack of transparency and representation. Most of us understand the economic situation, but as you can understand from the outpouring of concern, it feels like another betrayal that a few are deciding without much communication or consideration for the members.”

      That about sums things up in a nutshell. On the bright side, the constant feeling of betrayal should be a greater impulse to realize the goal of financial independence so that we will not keep being in the position of being betrayed.

      YES to CARP Las Vegas; but this is rather new and temporal.

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      • Robert Maynard

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        “YES to CARP Las Vegas; but this is rather new and temporal.”

        Another good point. While we see the need for financial independence, the jump to invest in the “sin city” of Las Vegas, without first ensuring that UTS is on a solid footing, looks a lot like misplaced priorities.

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  • Andrew Wilson

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    I pray that HSA will work collaboratively with the current UTS administration to keep the undergraduate program alive. Regardless of the opportunities that CARP at UNLV provides, True Mother understands the need for the movement to have its own Unificationist schools, where students can grow in the faith and develop the seeds of Unification culture. That is why even today she invests in Cheong Shim Graduate School of Theology, Sun Moon University, and a network of other schools in Korea. True Father invested in UTS and in education in America because he knew that the West also needed schools for developing Unificationists with strong faith and who have the ability to engage with Western culture.

    Barrytown College at UTS is an investment in the future of the movement in the West; it deserves to continue. Our second gen deserve a school where they can explore their faith in a nurturing and safe environment. Not only that, with this undergraduate program, UTS is on the upward path to financial sustainability. Indeed, the college is the key to the seminary’s future financial stability and to prospects of it getting off the dole for good.

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  • Elio Roman

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    “Most importantly of all, we need to understand our Founder’s vision for higher education and the spiritual, intellectual and academic growth of our young people. She (True Mother) has expressed that the best model is one that places our fine young students out in the public arena, investing time equally in both academic and outreach activities, including witnessing, and has provided scholarship help to develop that dream both in the USA and overseas. If UTS is to prosper, we must be attuned to heaven’s will.”

    I agree with the this. It is from Dr. Balcomb’s letter.

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  • Steve Dufour

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    I am not in a position to take sides or give advice. However please consider the example of the Unity Church, founded in 1889 and now has about 2 million members mostly in the USA. They have a main corporation which owns the copyrights to their publications and runs a seminary
    where ministers are trained. Each congregation hires its own pastor (much like Baptists do) with the pastor required to be a graduate of the seminary if they want to use the name “Unity.” It seems to work well for them.

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    • Robert Maynard

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      Yes, and the monastic environment of UTS makes it the perfect place for both educational and spiritual training. Any review of the history of Christisanity makes it clear that monasticism was a key element of its development. We need to stop running around chasing high cost “shiny objects” and focus in on the long term sustainable development of our movement while there still is one to develop. The real test of any movement is the test of time and we are in danger of failing that test.

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    • Douglas Burton

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      Steve has nailed a key issue. All pastors should be ReQuired to have a UTS degree or be currently enrolled. If this had been in place 30 years ago there would have been no difficulty in student recruitment.

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  • Raphael

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    I am not an alumni of the UTS but I am a believer in the opportunities that the UTS offers and I have always yearned to see how others in Africa can benefit from the UTS. Nigeria provides an opportunity for recruitment into the UTS to address the admission challenges. However, considering UTS programs in Nigeria will require adapting the system to fit into the Nigeria system of education. Since we have some UTS graduates in Africa, I will like to suggest that consideration be given to partnering with a Theological Seminary or university in Nigeria to offer UTS courses, especially in peace building and interreligious education. There is a high possibility of enrolling several students into the UTS programs here if the accreditation in the US allows programs in other places. We should not allow the vision of TPs for higher education for religious leaders to die away. Thanks to all

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    • David

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      This is a great idea! The more we partner with other religions the truer we stay to bringing different faiths together, acknowledging the many inspirations and blessings God has given to humanity. Partnering with schools around the world that seek to raise leaders within their faith communities is totally relevant. It will cause us to stretch beyond what is possible as well.

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  • Bernard

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    As I remember all these ventures that TF has visions had gone and it’s all about money. As far as I remember here our DC church had the same vision and they are doing something now. The WT had the vision to educate and raise members which has not happen under any leadership. That goes for the NYr…bought to provide quarters for members across the globe….it has not happen and so and so many projects going into HF struggles. It’s probably more problems than we acknowledge but should care for. Since the reports come never….how can we help when the PR is dismal. Covering our short comes won’t work. Let’s collect a survey with a report and see what the USA members can do about it…..but see that the funds are reportedly correct….we never receive reports of any kind. You being britt should see that we do not fall in the Catholic mentality.

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  • Alison Wakelin

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    Unfortunately this takes us back to the days before Foundation Day when we were not yet trying to being about some sort of stability and settlement, and always on some sort of emergency mobilization. The board is essentially saying the usual formula, essentially telling the students at Barrytown College that they should join CARP and become half time students, and then using Mother’s name to justify this. Shouldn’t this be a choice for the families themselves? And shouldn’t we be able to live up to our commitments?

    We need to see something different, some way that we are going to get the 2nd generation back into some level of trust with us. This will push them further away.

    I hope the Board cares enough about the future of the movement and the members to stand up for what they believe in, instead of falling back onto the old and comfortable ways that have led us into a place of wondering if there is truly any future for us.

    Alison

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    • Robert Maynard

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      “Shouldn’t this be a choice for the families themselves?”

      Another home run! Raising up children is primarily the responsibility of the parents. If we cannot do that, we cannot establish a strong family foundation. Without a strong family foundation, trying to create a local, state, national, or world foundation is a mere fantasy. There is no way to establish a family foundation if we farm out the raising of our children to the Church leadership, yet that is what they are insisting we do my usurping basic parental authority to make such decisions for our children.

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      • David

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        This is so essential. One reason why many 2nd gen have given up is that they feel powerless in living up to standard set by someone else. If we interpreted Father’s words as possibilities that potentially provide a great impact for God, ourselves and in the lives of people around us, we would self-generate creativity and power. Integrity and creativity will always trump loyalty and fear of being such.

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        • Robert Maynard

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          Exactly! We teach that everyone has an “original mind,” but are not erncouraged to use it. For those of us who joined on our own volition, we made a choice to accept the principle, not on anyone’s authority, but according to our own judgement of what is true. After years in the movement, why can we not still do the same. Are we spiritually regressing the longer we are in the movement? I am sorry, but it sure looks that way to me. We need to teach our children that it is not only ok to use their original minds, but vital to their spiritual growth.

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  • Linda Nagai

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    Dear Dr Balcomb, In my prayer last night I clearly received something from outside myself. It may be something useful, it may not. It was short and simple. “UTS should become an affiliate of Bridgeport” I am ignorant of all the issues, but since I felt the inspiration was from spiritual world, I want to share it. If Bridgeport could bring UTS under it’s wing in some way, would it give time for UTS to update it’s own program?
    Linda nagai

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    • KAMIYAMA

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      I GREE. You don’t need a message from spirit world or spend sleepless nights of brainstorming about this subject matter.

      UTS could function well, if it emerges with Un of bridge port (if some people would accept serving under some one else).

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  • Jim Caron

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    Everyone,
    What if we sold half the acreage to create an endowement?

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  • John Moon Kasongo

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    Thank you Dr. Balcomb for a very encouraging and clear report; we need urgent alternative financial support from the hundreds of UTS graduates around the world, while finding generous newdonors. In addition, recruiting has to meet and even exceed goals through our collective involvement going forward. God bless

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  • Arnold Evanson

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    Brother Balcomb,

    Here’s your comment and we need more info please.

    “While still accredited, much work needs to be done to rectify a number of shortcomings the commission identified. I went to MSA Headquarters in Philadelphia to learn more about the issues that need to be addressed”

    Can you please tell all of US what the “Identified” issues are that need to be addressed, as stated by the MSA?

    If I and we are to help, what exactly is MSA saying is needed to maintain accreditation?

    Thank you our good brother,
    Arnold Evanson – Holy Ground Harley Rider

    Reply

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